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Articles Archive for August 2011

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[18 Aug 2011 | No Comment | ]

Saddle Sore?
By Stan Dill
It happens to the best of riders in the best of saddles. Painful saddle sores. I didn’t realize this myself until I personally tried over 40 saddles, panty hose, bike hose, no hose (ouch), Vaseline and Bodyglide to keep me from chaffing during my rides. After little or no success with any of these, I was forced to invent Saddle Bums just for my own protection. Once National Cutting Champion Bobby Nelson said to me, “Saddle Bums Saved My A—“! I knew that what I created was …

Tack and Equipment »

[18 Aug 2011 | One Comment | ]

How to Fit a Western Saddle
By: Donna Mae Hastings
To fit a western saddle you must first measure your horse. You can’t call a tack shop and tell them you need a regular or wide tree and expect it to fit just like that. Each saddle manufacturer has its own way of measuring saddles and they all are different. Even in the manufacturers themselves as most saddles are made by hand not by machines. This especially changes in a used saddle because they stretch with use.
To Measure your horse you need …

Tack and Equipment »

[18 Aug 2011 | One Comment | ]

How to Fit a English Saddle
By: Donna Mae Hastings
I have put this information together to aid and assist you in searching for a saddle and to help you to take care of it once you get it. I hope this will help you in a most often frustrating job!! These ideas will not guarantee your saddle will fit but I hope it will help you in getting alot closer to it!!
To start with you must measure your horse, you can’t call a tack shop and tell them you need a …

Tack and Equipment »

[18 Aug 2011 | No Comment | ]

Girth Pain, it’s very real, and can
be treated very effectively!
By: Ian Bidstrup, BVSc (Hons), MACVSc (Equine Medicine), CertVetChiro. (AVCA), CertVetAcup (IVAS), Courtesy of Natural Horse Magazine
All horse owners have had at least one – a ñgirthy horseî, a horse that turns it÷s head and tries to bite when being girthed up. They÷ve been called ñpigs÷, bad mannered, and every other name under the sun. Most people put this behaviour down to attitude ¿ bad attitude ¿ but they÷ve actually got an excuse, and a very good one. Pain around the …

Tack and Equipment »

[18 Aug 2011 | 3 Comments | ]

Check your bit fit
By: Cheryl McNamee-Sutor
Proper bit fit is necessary in every riding discipline. When a bit does not fit a horse’s mouth properly, bad habits or injuries may result. If the horse has any scars or open cuts or rubs on his lips or tongue, this means he has had bit abuse. Many times this happens when an unknowledgeable rider has used a bit that does not fit properly or comfortably in the horse’s mouth. If you suspect either injury in your horse’s mouth, and/or an ill-fitting bit, …

Tack and Equipment »

[18 Aug 2011 | No Comment | ]

Tools of the Training Trade: Equipment
By: Dr. Ron Meredith
There’s a lot of mythunderstandings out there about training equipment. Some people seem to believe that using a certain piece of equipment guarantees their horse will learn something. Or they’ll be able to learn it easier or faster. Other people flat out condemn particular pieces of equipment no matter when or how they’re used. They can’t see any way using the thing could be justified. Another bunch puts down riders who use certain kinds of equipment as ignorant, unskilled, or inhumane.
When …

Tack and Equipment »

[18 Aug 2011 | One Comment | ]

Loud Bits Destroy Communication
By: Dr. Ron Meredith
A lot of people think you train horses with equipment. This is one of the biggest MythUnderstandings out there. Try this bit, try that bit. If those don’t work, try a thinner bit or one with a longer shank. If those don’t work, tie that sucker’s head down or crank him in with draw reins.
Most people believe that you should start a horse with a really quiet bit, so-to-speak. Then the further along in the horse’s training you go, the bigger the bit …

Tack and Equipment »

[18 Aug 2011 | No Comment | ]

Cleaning and Protecting Leather
By: Cheryl McNamee-Sutor
It is very important to care for your leather items from the first day you buy them. The most important reason to keep good care of your leather items is safety. If you do not care for your leather equipment well enough, it may crack or peel, or fall apart at the seams while you are riding or using it.
Another good reason to clean your equipment often is, in the event of an accidental drenching, or accidental mold-growing, how well you cared for your …

Tack and Equipment »

[18 Aug 2011 | One Comment | ]

Choosing Good, Quality Hay
By: Cheryle McNamee-Sutor
The Color of Good Hay:
Dark Green – This is the color of well-grown alfalfa.
Light-to-Medium Green – The color of well-stored grass hay. The hay was carefully harvested and has a good amount of the nutrients needed.
Bright Lime Green – This usually denotes alfalfa hay that has been treated with propionic acid (a preservative), which will not harm a horse.
The Appearance of Good Hay:
Texture – Stems are shorter and …

Tack and Equipment »

[18 Aug 2011 | 3 Comments | ]

The Trouble with Tom Thumb
By: Mark Rashid
As a trainer and clinician I am always being asked a variety of horse-related questions. I think the single most common one asked, however, is “what kind of bit should I use on my horse?”

In my situation, if I need to do any training on the horse whatsoever, I use a simple full-cheek snaffle bit. If the horse is well-trained and responsive, he stops, backs, and neck reins all on a light cue, then I use a curb or grazing bit. These are …