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[16 Aug 2011 | No Comment | ]

Equine Weight Estimates
Information courtesy of: Henry & Associates
Estimating your horses weight is simple. Just follow these instructions.

Example: If the Heartgirth is 70″ and the Length is 65″
Step #1: 70″ x 70″ x 65″ = 318,000
Step #2: Divide 318,000 by 300 = 1061.6
Step #3: Then 1061.6 + 50 = 1111.6
Horse weighs approximately 1111 pounds (plus or minus 3%)

Feeds and Nutrition »

[16 Aug 2011 | No Comment | ]

Vital Signs
By: Cheryl McNamee-Sutor
If you are responsible enough to own a horse, it is mandatory that you are responsible enough to educate yourself of taking care of him. Vital signs should be checked regularly, once a week is ideal, and every time you suspect any change in his behavior. Learning to accurately observe and judge your horse’s vital signs takes alot of practice. Your horse is counting on you to find and treat every problem or illness in its early stages!
If ANY concern arises, never hesitate to call your veterinarian!
[1] …

Feeds and Nutrition »

[16 Aug 2011 | No Comment | ]

Splendor in the Grass
Courtesy of Natural Horse Magazine
Horses love grass; glorious, sumptuous grass. They love its aroma; they love its taste. They love its softness, and they love to roll, rest, and romp in it. Horse owners love it because it really brings out the shine in his coat, the brightness in his eyes, and the energy in his every step. It also lessens the need for hay. Grass is a very nutritious and natural food for the horse. It is readily digestible and utilizable, and unless the horse’s system …

Feeds and Nutrition »

[16 Aug 2011 | No Comment | ]

Hind Leg Exercises
By: Cheryl McNamee-Sutor
Since so many horse-people have had such wonderful results from using these hind leg exercises, I will share them will all of you here. These exercises are to help lengthen and even out a horse’s stride, which allows him to move more freely. In order to perform the exercises, the horse must be able to stand relaxed and confident while you handle his feet.
The Basics:
A horse’s fear of being handled around his legs should be overcome well before the hooves are ever picked up. If …

Feeds and Nutrition »

[16 Aug 2011 | No Comment | ]

Clean Coats and White Markings
By: Cheryl McNamee-Sutor
Does your horse have a coat with white hair, or white leg markings or a blaze that never seems to stay white? In this article, you’ll learn all you need to know to keep his beautiful coat or markings sparkling clean!
If your horse’s coat or markings end up looking “yellow” or “dirty” like the horse shown to the left, this article is for you! You will soon be able to keep your horse’s white coat or markings sparkling HOT, just like the photo shown …

Feeds and Nutrition, Health and Vet Care »

[16 Aug 2011 | No Comment | ]

A Bit About Teeth
By: Cheryle McNamee-Sutor
0-2 Years Old:
Dental check-ups for foals are both necessary and helpful. It will ensure that your foals teeth are erupting properly, and will also accustom him to having his mouth handled. When a newborn foal is first born, the veterinarian will check its teeth for abnormalities which may interfere with nursing. As the foal grows, the veterinarian will check that all 24 deciduous teeth come in properly, and removes wolf teeth.
2-3 Years Old:
When a horse reaches …

Feeds and Nutrition, Health and Vet Care »

[16 Aug 2011 | No Comment | ]

About Vaccines
By: Cheryl McNamee-Sutor
How Do They Work?
(1) You inject the horse with an inactivated form of the organism that causes the disease.
(2) The horse’s immune system produces antibodies that fight that organism.
Important Facts:
(1) The horse’s immune system takes a minimum of 2 weeks to accumulate the antibodies needed.
(2) Always vaccinate at least 3-4 weeks before likely exposure to a disease.
(3) Always discuss with your veterinarian whether there are additional …

Feeds and Nutrition, Health and Vet Care »

[16 Aug 2011 | No Comment | ]

Foal Vaccination Chart
By: Cheryl McNamee-Sutor
Botulism
About: Organism: Clostridium botulinum. Organism is ingested or absorbed through wounds causing neurologic disease.
Dosage: 3-dose series at 30-day intervals. Annually thereafter.
Comments: Mares in areas of high risk (mostly Kentucky and Ohio) should be vaccinated 1 month prior to foaling to prevent shaker foal syndrome, a neurologic disease in newborn foals.
Encephalomyelitis (EEE,WEE,VEE)
About: Insect-bourne neurologic disease that is fatal.
Dosage: First Dose: 3-4 months of age. Second Dose: 4-5 months of age. Annually thereafter.
Comments: Mandatory vaccination. Booster every 6 months in risky areas. Should be administered in spring …

Feeds and Nutrition »

[16 Aug 2011 | No Comment | ]

Grooming and Grooming Tools
By: Cheryl McNamee-Sutor
TOOLS:
Rubber Curry: Do not use a metal curry comb on your horse! (Metal is used for cleaning other grooming tools!)
Dandy Brush: Stiff bristled brush.
Body Brush: Soft bristled brush, usually made of horse hair.
Hoof Pick/Brush: The hoofpick/brush combo can be found a most tack stores.
Mane Comb: I recommend plastic, you will be less likely to break the hairs.
Towel: Polishing towel/rag, helps remove sweat marks and gives the coat a nice shine after brushing.

Grooming:
When grooming a horse, you should always start at the top of his neck …

Feeds and Nutrition »

[16 Aug 2011 | No Comment | ]

Nitazoxanide: A New Treatment For
Horses with EPM
By: International Equine Science
For horses already suffering from EPM, a drug once thought to hold out great hope to people with AIDS for treatment of a protozoan?caused diarrhea may prove effective in the treatment of EPM.
The drug, nitazoxanide, has been studied by scientists in association with Blue Ridge Pharmaceuticals (BRP) in Greensboro, North Carolina. BRP is awaiting US Food & Drug Administration approval for use of the drug in horses.
“We’re in the review process,” said Scott Moffitt, BRP’s director of equine marketing. The …