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[16 Aug 2011 | No Comment | ]

Early Foal Care
By: Jennifer MacLeay DVM, PhD
Diplomate ACVIM
I am a referral veterinarian who specializes in internal medicine. This means that at this time of year I see a lot of sick newborn foals. A sick neonatal foal that requires intensive care and hospitalization can often survive and be a sound, healthy adult. But, such care is pricey. Average costs for a week of hospitalization can be $2,000 or more. Some of the many reasons that a foal may need hospitalization include; birth in a dirty environment (such as outside …

Feeds and Nutrition, Health and Vet Care »

[16 Aug 2011 | No Comment | ]

When a Horse Doesn’t Want That Shot
by International Equine Science
If a horse refuses to accept an injection, what do you, as either the treating veterinarian, or the concerned horse owner, do? Apply a twitch or get the horse into stocks? Yell at the horse, or hold it tightly against a wall?
According to Sue M. McDonnell, PhD, while any of these choices might get the job done that day, the next time the horse needs an injection, its behavior will most likely be worse, necessitating stronger restraint. Finally, the horse may …

Feeds and Nutrition, Health and Vet Care »

[16 Aug 2011 | One Comment | ]

Equine Dental Exams
By: Cheryl McNamee-Sutor
What does the exam consist of?
Floating: The horse’s teeth are floated using a rasp to remove sharp edges. If the veterinarian only pulls the horse’s tongue to the side while floating with the other, he hasn’t executed a thorough dental exam.
Speculum: A speculum is an instrument the veterinarian should use on every horse, which has mouthplates to lock the mouth open and helps keep the tongue out of the way. If the tongue is not kept out of …

Feeds and Nutrition »

[16 Aug 2011 | No Comment | ]

Navicular Syndrome
By: Ride ‘Da Kur
Navicular syndrome (NS), is the most common cause of lameness in the front legs of horses. We are still unsure why NS occurs. Navicular “disease” has never been justly defined, therefore, Researchers and Lameness Specialists have substituted the term “disease” with “syndrome”. Syndrome: a commonly recurring group of symptoms of unknown cause.
It is not always possible to reveal the exact cause of NS. A very large diversity of problems can cause NS, so it is very difficult to diagnose and treat the syndrome. NS is determined …

Feeds and Nutrition »

[16 Aug 2011 | No Comment | ]

How to Safely Check Your Horse’s Mouth
By: Susan Ajamian
Demonstrated by Spencer La Flure, EqD Adv. Cert.
Equine Dentist Spencer La Flure demonstrates how to safely check your horse’s teeth and mouth, which you should do two or three times a year for most horses. Do NOT put your hand into your horse’s mouth. Not only is the crushing power of the horse’s jaw like a crocodile’s, but you can get serious cuts, and possibly life-threatening infections, from a sharp tooth. Do NOT pull the tongue out; this can damage the delicate …

Feeds and Nutrition »

[16 Aug 2011 | No Comment | ]

Sunscreen For Horses
By: Jessica Jahiel
Q: What type of sunscreen should be used on a horse? Can I use a human sunscreen product? I should probably rephrase that question because I have been using products meant for humans with 30+ or 50 SPF on sun sensitive areas for our few horses. We have a 16-year-old white appaloosa with light brown spots who gets sunburn on his nose, lips, the tips of his ears, around his eyes and now on the dock of his tail where his hair is thin and …

Feeds and Nutrition »

[16 Aug 2011 | No Comment | ]

More About the West Nile Virus
By: Dr. Jessica Jahiel
Question
Dear Jessica,
We are beginning to get very worried about this West Nile Virus that we hear and read about all the time. We’ve heard all kinds of things about it, that it is spread by mosquitoes and birds and that infected horses should be destroyed, because they will quickly infect other horses and humans. Our vet says that he doesn’t think it’s that serious, but he is basically a cattle vet, not a horse vet, and I don’t think that horses are …

Feeds and Nutrition »

[16 Aug 2011 | No Comment | ]

The Relationship Between Armadillos and EPM
By: International Equine Science
The armadillo is an intermediate host for Sarcocystis neurona, the parasite that causes EPM in horses. The first evidence that the nine-banded armadillo (Dasypus novemcinctus) is a host was reported by a team of University of Florida and Washington State University researchers.
“We chose the armadillo to study because they are an available food source for opossums,” said Andy Cheadle, MS, one of the lead researchers and a PhD candidate at the University of Florida. Opossums are a definitive host for S. neurona …

Ask the Expert, Feeds and Nutrition »

[16 Aug 2011 | 4 Comments | ]

Fusing Hocks
We asked horse training expert Dr. Jessica Jahiel, whose teaching goal is to develop balanced, willing, forward horses and thoughtful riders. More about Dr.Jahiel
Question
Dear Jessica:
I have talked about this with my vet once, and although he is a very good vet, he is not much of a communicator with us humans. I plan to talk to him again when he comes back in a few weeks, and I’m hoping that you will be able to work your usual magic and help me understand the issue well enough to ask …

Ask the Expert, Feeds and Nutrition »

[16 Aug 2011 | 2 Comments | ]

Moon Blindness
We asked horse training expert Dr. Jessica Jahiel, whose teaching goal is to develop balanced, willing, forward horses and thoughtful riders. More about Dr.Jahiel
Question
Dear Jessica:
My horse’s foal (who’s now grown up) was seven when he got moon blindness in both eyes and had to be put down. My horse is 19 now and had Smoky, the foal, when she was 10. Is there any sort of reverse-genetic thing that might cause her to get moon blindness? And also, what exactly is moon blindness and can it be prevented?
Cindal
Answer
Hi Cindal!
First, …