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[16 Aug 2011 | One Comment | ]

Q. Should I clip my horse for winter?
We asked horse training expert Dr. Jessica Jahiel, whose teaching goal is to develop balanced, willing, forward horses and thoughtful riders. More on Jessica
From: Mina
Hi Jessica,
First, I would like to thank you for the great advice you give.
I am not sure if I should clip my horse for the winter. I am currently blanketing him which has helped him not to grow a really thick coat but he still sweats a lot when I ride him. I ride him six days a week …

Ask the Expert, Health and Vet Care »

[16 Aug 2011 | One Comment | ]

Should I blanket my horse in the cold? We asked horse training expert Dr. Jessica Jahiel, whose teaching goal is to develop balanced, willing, forward horses and thoughtful riders. More on Jessica
From: June
Dear Jessica,
I have been reading your advice mail for about a month. I don’t have time to read all of the posts but enjoy the ones I do read.
I acquired a 3 year old Morgan last March. She is the only horse I own presently and is the 4th horse I have owned. I live in the foothills of …

Feeds and Nutrition, Health and Vet Care »

[16 Aug 2011 | No Comment | ]

Equine Weight Estimates
Information courtesy of: Henry & Associates
Estimating your horses weight is simple. Just follow these instructions.

Example: If the Heartgirth is 70″ and the Length is 65″
Step #1: 70″ x 70″ x 65″ = 318,000
Step #2: Divide 318,000 by 300 = 1061.6
Step #3: Then 1061.6 + 50 = 1111.6
Horse weighs approximately 1111 pounds (plus or minus 3%)

Feeds and Nutrition, Health and Vet Care »

[16 Aug 2011 | No Comment | ]

A Bit About Teeth
By: Cheryle McNamee-Sutor
0-2 Years Old:
Dental check-ups for foals are both necessary and helpful. It will ensure that your foals teeth are erupting properly, and will also accustom him to having his mouth handled. When a newborn foal is first born, the veterinarian will check its teeth for abnormalities which may interfere with nursing. As the foal grows, the veterinarian will check that all 24 deciduous teeth come in properly, and removes wolf teeth.
2-3 Years Old:
When a horse reaches …

Feeds and Nutrition, Health and Vet Care »

[16 Aug 2011 | No Comment | ]

About Vaccines
By: Cheryl McNamee-Sutor
How Do They Work?
(1) You inject the horse with an inactivated form of the organism that causes the disease.
(2) The horse’s immune system produces antibodies that fight that organism.
Important Facts:
(1) The horse’s immune system takes a minimum of 2 weeks to accumulate the antibodies needed.
(2) Always vaccinate at least 3-4 weeks before likely exposure to a disease.
(3) Always discuss with your veterinarian whether there are additional …

Feeds and Nutrition, Health and Vet Care »

[16 Aug 2011 | No Comment | ]

Foal Vaccination Chart
By: Cheryl McNamee-Sutor
Botulism
About: Organism: Clostridium botulinum. Organism is ingested or absorbed through wounds causing neurologic disease.
Dosage: 3-dose series at 30-day intervals. Annually thereafter.
Comments: Mares in areas of high risk (mostly Kentucky and Ohio) should be vaccinated 1 month prior to foaling to prevent shaker foal syndrome, a neurologic disease in newborn foals.
Encephalomyelitis (EEE,WEE,VEE)
About: Insect-bourne neurologic disease that is fatal.
Dosage: First Dose: 3-4 months of age. Second Dose: 4-5 months of age. Annually thereafter.
Comments: Mandatory vaccination. Booster every 6 months in risky areas. Should be administered in spring …

Feeds and Nutrition, Health and Vet Care »

[16 Aug 2011 | No Comment | ]

When a Horse Doesn’t Want That Shot
by International Equine Science
If a horse refuses to accept an injection, what do you, as either the treating veterinarian, or the concerned horse owner, do? Apply a twitch or get the horse into stocks? Yell at the horse, or hold it tightly against a wall?
According to Sue M. McDonnell, PhD, while any of these choices might get the job done that day, the next time the horse needs an injection, its behavior will most likely be worse, necessitating stronger restraint. Finally, the horse may …

Feeds and Nutrition, Health and Vet Care »

[16 Aug 2011 | One Comment | ]

Equine Dental Exams
By: Cheryl McNamee-Sutor
What does the exam consist of?
Floating: The horse’s teeth are floated using a rasp to remove sharp edges. If the veterinarian only pulls the horse’s tongue to the side while floating with the other, he hasn’t executed a thorough dental exam.
Speculum: A speculum is an instrument the veterinarian should use on every horse, which has mouthplates to lock the mouth open and helps keep the tongue out of the way. If the tongue is not kept out of …

Feeds and Nutrition, Health and Vet Care »

[16 Aug 2011 | No Comment | ]

Breeding Your Mare By Transported Semen — Being Prepared
By Amy Gumz
The use of transported cooled semen is now a big reality for breeders of most breeds of horses everywhere. The concept of transported semen is simple enough. A stallion’s semen is collected and the semen is cooled and shipped to the awaiting mare. The semen is delivered the same day or the next day to the mare owner, where a veterinarian or technician inseminates the mare.
Unfortunately, reality is not as simple as the concept of shipped semen. First, equine sperm …

Health and Vet Care, The Barn »

[16 Aug 2011 | No Comment | ]

Foot and Mouth Disease
By: Jessica Jahiel
Editor’s Note: This is a discussion with Dr. Jessica Jahiel about the transmission of foot and mouth disease and how it relates to horses.
Dear Jessica, what are the chances that someone could bring foot-and-mouth disease to the United States if they spend their vacation riding horses in Ireland? And what would this do to the horses at our home farm? Are there special precautions to take, or would it be better just not to go to Ireland? I need to know this because my …