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Articles in the Riding and Training Category

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[18 Aug 2011 | No Comment | ]

How You Think and What You Say is How You Ride
By: Montie Eagle, Courtesy of Natural Horse Magazine
Our horses often faithfully mirror how we riders think and speak about ourselves as well as our horses. At some time in the past each one of us has struggled to master riding skills that seemed to be elusive, but few of us realized how our mastery often depended on how we spoke about what we were doing.
One frustrated student wails, “I”ll never learn my posting diagonals!” A second states, “I can”t sit …

Riding and Training »

[18 Aug 2011 | No Comment | ]

Common Sense on the Trail
By: Rhett Russell, Courtesy of Natural Horse Magazine
It’s a tremendous responsibility being a horse owner. Like most of you, I got a horse to have fun. The relationship and trust that we have built up over the years have made trail riding even more enjoyable. I bought my first horse with the romantic idea of going fishing in the mountains – just me and my horse. I trail ride with all kinds of people who have different skills and abilities. We all share the love of …

Riding and Training »

[18 Aug 2011 | No Comment | ]

Is Riding as Much Fun as It Used to Be?
By: Pat Parelli, Courtesy of Natural Horse Magazine
Are you stuck in a rut?
Do you keep doing the same thing with your horse every time… trails, trails, trails… dressage, dressage, dressage… rope, rope, rope… spin, spin, spin… jump, jump, jump?
Lots of people lose interest in horses simply because they run out of new things to do. You might start out riding every day or as often as possible when you are learning and mastering new skills. But after a while, after doing …

Riding and Training »

[18 Aug 2011 | No Comment | ]

TTouching Your Horse
By: Shelly Moore, Courtesy of Natural Horse Magazine
My introduction to TTEAM and TTouch occurred about 8 years ago. I was signed up to participate in a one-day ground-driving clinic late in October. A few weeks prior to the clinic I had a rather serious horse accident, which left me with limited use of my right arm and a probability for major surgery. My orthopedic surgeon was trying to prepare me For what he thought was inevitable shoulder surgery to repair a three-degree separation of the shoulder. The thought …

Riding and Training »

[18 Aug 2011 | No Comment | ]

The Nature of the Sport
By: J. Ashton Moore
As riders and trainers, most of us like to think of ourselves as kindly, methodical, reasonable, and caring.
However it is a good idea to soul-search a little and examine our motives. The motives often determine the methods.
Why are we doing this horse thing?
For exercise
To prove our mastery and control over another entity, for its own sake – control
For the sheer unexplainable pleasure of working with “the noble horse”

Riding and Training »

[18 Aug 2011 | No Comment | ]

Catching the Horse
By: Clinton Anderson, Courtesy of Natural Horse Magazine
Have you ever walked into a pasture with a horse that has never been handled before? Try walking straight up to him to put a halter on him. Sounds easy, but you can bet that the horse will do anything in its power to get away from you. To the horse you are a predator walking straight towards him. You know you are not going to hurt him, but the horse thinks he needs to run away from you in order …

Riding and Training »

[18 Aug 2011 | No Comment | ]

The Nature of the Horse
By: J. Ashton Moore
Of special importance in dealing with the nature of the horse is to understand that “Nature” is really “Natures”.
The psychological, emotional nature of the horse
The herding nature
The flight nature (timidity)
The fight nature (if it doesn’t flee, kill it or breed it)
The physical nature of the horse

Riding and Training »

[18 Aug 2011 | No Comment | ]

Improving Training By Assessing Your Horse
By: Mary Ann Simonds, Courtesy of Natural Horse Magazine
No two horses are alike, and yet we often try to use the same training techniques on horses with various learning styles. Although good horse educators do adapt their training techniques to fit the horse, far too many either decide the horse is “no good”, or help the horse develop behavioral or physical problems. Most behavioral problems stem from misunderstandings between horse and rider. Many problems can be prevented if a little assessment of the horse is …

Riding and Training »

[18 Aug 2011 | No Comment | ]

The Patience Game
By: Cheryl McNamee-Sutor
This article builds on our Sensitizing and Desensitizing concepts, so it is a good idea to also read that training article.
Would you like your horse to become more responsive to your cues? Have you ever applied a cue to your horse, only to find that he is completetly ignoring your request? You know for a fact your horse can feel the cue, but he is simply ignoring and/or refusing to obey to his full potential. We call this the “The Patience Game”, all horses have played …

Riding and Training »

[18 Aug 2011 | No Comment | ]

Desensitizing and Sensitizing
By: Cheryl McNamee-Sutor
What is a “signal” or “cue”?
This is anything that puts pressure on the horse. A signal is a stimulus. Surprisingly, a signal does not have to be physical. You can have your horse respond to a stimulus without ever touching him. A signal can be applied to your horse by eye contact, the form of your body/stance, or physical pressure (ex. with your hand or lead rope).
What is Desensitizing?
This is when you continually apply a stimulus until all response is eliminated. You are desensitizing your horse …