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[18 Aug 2011 | No Comment | ]

Training Motivators
By: Cheryl McNamee-Sutor
In order to teach any horse what you’d like it to do, you need to have a motivator. Horses won’t learn or perform without good motivation. And, the motivation that you provide must be a greater motivator that others that your horse is also exposed to. For example, if your horse is “buddy sour”, your motivator must be a better one than his buddies who are calling him from the barn or from a nearby pasture. Otherwise, all of his performance and attention are taken off of …

Riding and Training »

[18 Aug 2011 | No Comment | ]

The One-Rein Stop Explained
By: Kim Walnes, Courtesy of Natural Horse Magazine
For those of you who are new to the one-rein halt, it is an exercise performed whenever the horse is heavy on the bit, locked up in his jaw and/or body, leaning into a turn instead of bending, going faster than you desire, or has his attention focused on something other than you. It is also an emergency stopping device.
It is extremely important when doing this exercise that you remember to sit in the middle of your horse, and look …

Riding and Training »

[18 Aug 2011 | No Comment | ]

Horse-Logical Communication Begins
With Grooming
By: Ron Meredith
A lot of amateur trainers MythUnderstand what the training process is all about. They think that training involves dominating a horse, showing him who’s boss. They approach training as though it were a battle in which one party wins and the other loses.
Good training is not about confrontation. It’s about building a horse-logical communication system. As trainer, you do your talking as a non-hunting predator just walking through the herd or in the role of lead mare in your little herd of two. But …

Riding and Training »

[18 Aug 2011 | No Comment | ]

How do I keep my horse round at the canter?
By: Leslie Desmond, Courtesy of Natural Horse Magazine
This is a very good question! It can be answered in many ways. One way is to get control of all the body parts, then ask the horse to canter, and ride. Ride the roundness that’s in him at birth, ride it right up to a spot just below the surface!
This works well when the components of this maneuver are well understood by the rider. Because this round posture is natural to the horse, …

Riding and Training »

[18 Aug 2011 | No Comment | ]

Keeping a Horse’s Attention
By: Ron Meredith
There are probably as many jokes about getting a mule’s attention with a two-by-four as there are pickup trucks in Texas. When you are teaching your horse to heed, you must keep bringing its attention back to you. But you don’t want to use a two-by-four. You don’t want do a lot of exciting or loud things that will cause the horse to do a lot of exciting or loud things. You want to use body position and body language that is noticeable to …

Riding and Training »

[18 Aug 2011 | No Comment | ]

The Daily Training Routine
By: Dr. Ron Meredith
It takes a long time to develop a full communication system with a horse. When you first begin the training process, the horse’s vocabulary of understanding is pretty limited and that limits what you can expect of him. As he learns more, you can expect more.
Eventually there will come a time when you have developed full communication with the horse and you know he understands what you are asking. You support every request with a corridor of pressures applied consistently at every stride. …

Riding and Training »

[18 Aug 2011 | No Comment | ]

Headshy Horses
By: Cheryl McNamee-Sutor
Find the Source of the Problem:
The very first thing to rule out in any situation is a health problem. Many times a horse will begin to become headshy or begin tossing his head when he has an ear infection, sharp teeth that need to be filed down, or other health problems that cause pain in the horse’s head area. If your horse has always been good about people handling his head, and has recently become headshy, you should definitely have a veterinarian inspect your horse to …

Riding and Training »

[18 Aug 2011 | No Comment | ]

Focus & Time
Provided By: Rhett Russell
FOCUS
Focus is your ability to keep the horse÷s attention on you. If you have a horse that is looking around at other horses, checking out a barking dog, or not paying attention to you ¿ you have a respect problem. When working with your horse, make sure that they are focused on you. You can tell a lot about a horse by what it is looking at an where it÷s ears are — unless the horse is mad or you have taught them to be …

Riding and Training »

[18 Aug 2011 | No Comment | ]

The Importance of Directing Every Stride
By: Dr. Ron Meredith
When you first start training a horse, everything is about getting his attention. Once you’ve got his attention, you start directing his attention where you want it to go. To get the horse to pay attention to you, however, you first have to pay attention to the horse.
We call our basic groundwork lessons “heeding.” It’s a play on words. To an observer, it looks like the handler is moving the horse around like a dog at heel. Or you can think …

Riding and Training »

[18 Aug 2011 | No Comment | ]

Feel
by Rhett Russell
Feel is a concept, which is your responsibility as a horse owner or trainer. You need to learn to distinguish when your horse has responded and how to reward this. What feel means is the ability to tell when a change has happened with the horse, adjust and reward the horse. Change may be good or bad, you have probably heard people say they are looking for a soft feel from the horse.
An example of this would be asking a horse to bend at the poll while standing …